Tuesday, July 11, 2006

Inwood, 216th Street


Mary Sargent © 2006

The change of format signals the intent to add more writing. (Oh, no!) The group of photographs that I've been posting since Sunday were all taken on a couple of short blocks on the tip of Manhattan. Get out your street maps and take a look at 215th and 216th Streets as they end at the Harlem River. This is a desolate couple of blocks, storage for Sanitation trucks and MTA buses. The IND subway yard is to the south. No one would walk here unless they had a pretty damn good reason. My reason is that I'm involved in a compulsion, I mean goal, of walking every street in Manhattan. A pretty damn good reason. I was there in the late afternoon, no one else around, until I got to the end of 215th Street, where there was a group of kids playing. Quite the surprise. See Monday's posting. I got a number of other beautiful photographs, I believe, in that seemingly barren area, and I want to show you a few more before I move on. My sense of beauty may not be yours, however. Does anyone else think this photograph is beautiful? But you must click to enlarge before you make your judgment.

6 comments:

flyinglady said...

To me this photograph is artful, and the colors and textures are lovely. But it doesn't move me as do some of the others.

flyinglady said...

I'd like to add a few things. I love the architectural qualities of the photograph. Very compelling. Also I love the sense of order layered with the more serendipitous graffiti. And the many shades of brown and shale. Very soft and delicious!

Barbara said...

I feel a sense of dynamic movement within the abstract composition that draws my eye back and forth in an engaging way.

Anonymous said...

yes yes I think it's beautiful too. Also, as it was coming into focus, piece by piece, suddenly the lights went on,which was such a weird thing to happen in a still shot!!

Luka

invisible girl said...

It is very nicely composed. The puddle by the fire hydrant is strangely attractive.

Anonymous said...

I like the way the curves in that building do something to the rectangle shape of the picture - warp, distort, expand or stretch it. You're right - this is much more apparent when the picture is enlarged.

David